five things I want

1) I want to write a secondary-world fantasy, where I can Make Shit Up rather than having to bend myself around reality.

2) I want to write short stories again.

3) I want to move forward on some piece of the logjam of ideas building up in my mind.

4) I want to know what I’m doing next.

5) I really, really want to be done with this revision, so I can get on with my life.

0 Responses to “five things I want”

  1. jimhines

    1) I’m looking forward to writing my next book, which is set in our world, because I can base things on reality and don’t have to make *everything* up.

    2) I’m writing a short story, and my brain is still stuck on novel mode.

    3) Okay, I’m with you on this one.

    4) Same here. Impatient author is impatient πŸ™‚

    5) I really want to get through this first draft of the short story so I can get to the revision!

    ::Is amused::

    • Marie Brennan

      I know — let’s swap! You can figure out how to convey the timeline of what happened in London on the evening of October 30th, 1883, without boring the reader to tears, and I’ll make up a world for you! And it will be a short story (though, er, not one of the ones I’m trying to clear off my list), and at least we’ll both know what we’re doing next. It’s a win-win situation!

  2. desperance

    1) I want to write a secondary-world fantasy, where I can Make Shit Up rather than having to bend myself around reality

    But you have to learn so much, before you can Make It Up convincingly! At least in the real world you know so much of that shit already… *pines for his mimetic fictions of yesteryear*

    • tchernabyelo

      True dat. I have been trying to Make Shit Up for, oh, about twenty years or so, and I still find myself going “hmm, I need to find out more about 17th century army logistics” or “so, how did preindustrial gem mining actually work?”…

      • Marie Brennan

        Having done both, though, they aren’t the same kind of thing. In a secondary world, I can diverge from how things were done in real history, so long as what I say is plausible. Not so, with historical fiction.

  3. artemisgrey

    Ha! That sounds like the list I made last night before I went to bed! The last one had me laughing maniacally because I came home from the conference to work on a manuscript that’s gotten a lot of interest and now I suddenly have another character in it! I shit you not, this chick showed up and won’t leave and even though she’s secondary, she’s pivotal (and makes certain events work SO much better because of her presence) and now I’m stuck with her.

    I’m not sure if it’s comforting or terrifying to know that someone as accomplished as yourself can still be harried by the ravens of revision… πŸ˜€

    • Marie Brennan

      The ravens of revision, alas, never really go away. If you write a book that seems to escape them, it’s a fluke, not a transition; they’ll be back.

  4. jennifergale

    Mine is a list of opposites…but I hear you on #5. Grr.

  5. marumae

    You’ll be done soon, don’t worry! I have faith! I’d love to see you tackle a secondary world fantasy, that’d be awesome. πŸ˜€

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