He’s a pushy bastard, for a dead man . . . .

Half an hour ago, “Waiting for Beauty” was the short story I was planning to write next, and “The Deaths of Christopher Marlowe” was one of those ideas that sounded vaguely nifty, but had been sitting around for quite a while and was never actually going to get written.

Now, thanks to matociquala posting her new opening paragraphs for The Stratford Man, Kit’s woken up again in my subconscious. Woken up again, found an opening line, found some more lines, mugged “Waiting for Beauty” and dumped it in a dark alley, cracked his knuckles, picked up a sap, and begun casting a speculative eye at the novel revisions I promised to send my agent soon.

Uppity little bastard. The structure of the story did a brief do-si-do, and I still may not be entirely sure where it’s going, but I know what half or more of it will be, and that’s more than enough for me to get started writing. Just as soon as I, y’know, read every bit of information and crackpot speculation about May 30th, 1593 that I can get my hands on.

And do those revisions. They should get priority, and a novel’s big enough to take a short story in a fight. But Kit’s a sneaky bastard, in addition to being uppity, and I fear he may dodge through the novel’s defenses and emerge in the lead.

In which case, the only real solution will be to write his story as fast as possible, so I can get on with the things I ought to be doing.

“The Deaths of Christopher Marlowe”

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0 Responses to “He’s a pushy bastard, for a dead man . . . .”

  1. moonandserpent

    Woken up again, found an opening line, found some more lines, mugged “Waiting for Beauty” and dumped it in a dark alley, cracked his knuckles, picked up a sap, and begun casting a speculative eye at the novel revisions I promised to send my agent soon.

    Well played, Mr. Marlowe. Well played, indeed.

  2. ombriel

    I saw her post and wondered if you had too, and whether it would have this effect on you. *grin*

  3. laurelwen

    Someday I will have told every single person I know about the performance of Dr. Faustus that I saw in college. But that day is not today.

    • Marie Brennan

      has a great icon with a . . . modified line from that play. It flashes the text “What? Wouldst thou have me do Faustus?” and then adds, “Punctuation counts.”

  4. clauclauclaudia

    That’s an awesome story title. Yet another reason to be glad of . ๐Ÿ™‚

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